Has it really been two months since I last posted? Blimey. I can never think of anything to write about though, and it's more interesting reading about you lot than it is writing about anything that I've been doing.

Ran out of episodes of Lucifer, and have no idea when season four is likely to appear, but The Gifted came back, which sort of filled a hole. It's been brilliant again, but it'll be finishing soon, as it only has short seasons. Cold Feet has come back too, and I recorded episode one, but haven't watched it yet. Which is awkward, as it will soon be time for episode two. Can't seem to summon up the enthusiasm though. No more Doctor Who until early 2020, but I did remember the other day that I started watching Heroes season one a couple of years back, and didn't get past about episode five. So I suppose I could go back to that at some point. I was enjoying it. It's just a question of a: remembering, and b: being bothered to get the DVDs out.

Reading-wise, I've just finished a book on Irish history, which was pretty lightweight, but interesting enough. I've been wanting to read something on general 19th century Irish life for a while, since family history research showed me that most of my family seem to have come from there. I wish the rest was as easy to read about (Slovenian history tends to be swallowed up by Habsburg stuff, since Slovenia technically didn't exist until comparatively recently, and 'modern' Alexandria, despite being a multi-ethnic metropolis until the Suez Crisis, seems mainly the preserve of literary writing, rather than historical. Italy is a bit easier, if lacking on the history of ordinary people). It's nice getting a bit of historical context. Going in an entirely different direction, I'll probably read Neil Gaiman's take on Norse mythology next.

Beyond that, there has been work, trying to get stuff done in the garden, and Fandom Stockinging. 2018 came to a complicated conclusion, and I'm rather glad to have got it out of the way. Best book read in 2018? Either The Dinosaur Hunters by Deborah Cadbury, or Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari. I would have said that the best album of 2018 was Who Sold The Moon? by Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds, but apparently that came out in 2017. So... As Long As I Have You by Roger Daltrey perhaps. Best film would have to be Infinity War I guess, as it's the only 2018 film I watched. Although The Greatest Showman was released in the UK on Boxing Day 2017, so that nearly counts. Damn it, it counts. That's the best film of 2018 (and I don't make my book choices be from the year, so why discriminate!) And best telly is obviously Lucifer, although many hurrahs for the Thirteenth Doctor. Doctor Who has been so good this year.

I'm not sure if the orange lump on my lap is a cat disguised as a teddy bear, or a teddy bear disguised as a cat, but either way, it makes it very hard to type! I am being kneaded and dribbled on. And now I have to go and do stuff. Fandom Stocking reveals should be later today, so have a good time, everyone. And then it will be Festivids! Huzzah.

Bye.
swordznsorcery: (tardis)
( Jan. 13th, 2019 17:08)
Fandom: Department S and Doctor Who
Characters: Annabelle Hurst, Liz Shaw, Stewart Sullivan, Jason King, Sir Curtis Seretse, the Brigadier
Gen, c.5800 words

[community profile] fandom_stocking fic for [personal profile] thisbluespirit

... )
swordznsorcery: (Default)
( Jan. 6th, 2019 16:31)
Fandom: Robin Of Sherwood and Doctor Who
Characters: Abbot Hugo de Rainault and the Meddling Monk
Gen, c.2000 words

[community profile] fandom_stocking fic for [personal profile] liadtbunny

... )
swordznsorcery: (lucifer)
( Nov. 5th, 2018 20:17)
I keep forgetting to do this - and when I don't forget, I never seem to have the time. But I have watched things! And some of them aren't Lucifer. For one thing, how good is Doctor Who at the moment?! I'm delighted with the new series. Jodie Whittaker feels more like the Doctor that I grew up watching than any of the other New Series takes on the character. No "lonely god" nonsense. No super-powerful being. Back to being a cosmic hobo (albeit a really, really clever one). I like her gang lots, I like the group dynamic, and I'm having fun. Also, they don't seem to be trying to make each episode BIGGER than the last, and the music hasn't annoyed me once yet. It's remembered that it's only supposed to be incidental, and not a constant cacophony of howling voices. Huzzah. So I am happy about all of that.

Also, the other day I happened to look at a TV guide for the first time in about three years, and I saw that a channel called Talking Pictures TV were showing a 1954 film called It Should Happen To You. Not a very well known film, but it was Jack Lemmon's first big role, and it also starred Judy Holliday. So obviously I had to record that. I watched it at the weekend, and it was daft and entertaining, and very 1950s. Judy Holliday was wonderful. She's almost unknown now, which is terribly sad. Primarily a Broadway star, she only made a few films, because she died young. She really lights up the screen though. She's magnetic - and with a great singing voice too. I first saw her in Bells Are Ringing (1960), the film version of one of her Broadway hits. She stars in the film with Dean Martin, and I very much recommend it if it ever comes up on TV. Anyway, It Should Happen To You gave her a good opportunity to shine, and raise more than a few smiles.

My beloved Top Of The Pops repeats have hit a low point - Chris de Bleurgh at number one forever with Lady In Red. Impressively, it's even worse than I remembered. And, just to make things even worse, they let him sing it live, just him and his piano. Seriously, it's what the fast forward button was invented for; although the iPlayer doesn't really do fast forward. They should look into that, just in case he's ever in the charts again. More seriously, all this means that we've arrived in August of 1986. I'm starting secondary school any time now. This is extremely disconcerting. Some things you really don't want to live through again, even obliquely.

Not reading much lately. I've been sorting through some books to see what I can get rid of, so I've been sort of re-reading a few old ones. Currently half reading Shadowmancer, by GP Taylor. It's definitely going in the jumble box!

Mostly though, I'm still watching Lucifer. Loving season three. It got an increase in episodes, and they decided to use them by going old school, and doing a bunch of standalones. It gives the support cast more of a chance to shine, and they've come up with some brilliant little detours from the main plot. The field trip to Las Vegas was wonderful, and there was also a fun flashback episode, showing Lucifer's arrival on Earth, pre-series. The internet doesn't seem to enjoy it all nearly as much as I do, as not every second of every episode is spent focused on The Ship, but whatever. I don't think I'll ever understand modern telly viewers.

I'll leave you with some Lucifer fanvids, as I found a vidder on YouTube who makes awesome ones. Probably some mild and non-specific spoilers (or possibly whacking great ones, depending on your outlook), so approach with caution if you're thinking of giving the show a go. Or just watch them anyway, as they're brill.

Bring Out The Bad (a compilation of the show's sillier side, as well as some drama):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysjYrEIruuw

A Little Wicked (a celebration of the glory that is Maze):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5wu5Q0SW0yk

I Like Trouble (in which there is trouble):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmXhGaeH8IE
swordznsorcery: (tardis)
( Jul. 28th, 2018 20:03)
A couple of you have done this, and I thought I'd join in, as once again I haven't posted in ages. And this is easy!

List the first sentence (or two because a couple of those first sentences are quite short) of each of the last ten fics you posted.

    The sky screamed with the fury of a thousand owls.
    Growth And Decay (The Gormenghast Trilogy)

    "Hove to, and prepare to be boarded!"
    Never A Dull Moment (Blake's 7)

    "I don't think this is London," said Ian, from the doorway of the TARDIS.
    Tomorrow (Doctor Who)

    They stood together at the end of it all, in a pool of black light, watching the last of the stars fade.
    Ebb And Flow (Sapphire & Steel)

    Cutter still blamed Helen.
    Toothmarks (Primeval)

    Sometimes the Earth died in fire.
    Fire & Brimstone (Captain Jack)

    There was green upon the air once again.
    The Green Woman (Robin Of Sherwood)

    "It's Christmas," observed Sapphire, with a trace of wonder in her tone.
    Assignment 3½ (Sapphire & Steel)

    For all the undoubted blessings and benefits that he had discovered in the 1960s, there were, thought Adam Adamant, one or two definite failings also to be found in that august decade.
    The Violet Viper (Adam Adamant Lives!)

    Clocks ticked. So many clocks, lining the walls, ticking and tocking away the seconds of inexorable time.
    Drabble (Doctor Who)
swordznsorcery: (johnblack)
( Jan. 17th, 2018 21:23)
So, a little while ago I found this post, written on August 6th and then forgotten about entirely. So I de-privated it, and updated the date, and hoped that overlooking it for a couple of months didn't make me look like too much of an idiot. Except that now I find I've done it again. Several times!

Last spring, in lieu of the usual Obscure & British ficfest, there was [community profile] tic_tac_woe. And I got a lovely bingo card, and started to fill it; and then came the year of rushing about like a crazy person. I now find I have four short stories I'd forgotten I'd written, posted privately (presumably waiting for me to be sure they were ready for decloaking) on April 24th and 30th, and May 12th and 18th. I haven't got a bingo, but I thought I'd better do something with the wretched things before I forget them again! So here are some links to some very old posts:

Fire & Brimstone (400 words, Captain Jack Harkness)

Toothmarks (2000 words, Primeval)

Ebb And Flow (700 words, Sapphire & Steel)

Tomorrow (4000 words, Doctor Who)

And I apologise profusely to the world for bashing it over the head four times in one post. It's nothing personal, honest.
swordznsorcery: (sleepy team)
( Dec. 30th, 2017 21:47)
Nicked off [personal profile] liadtbunny, mainly because I have to post more, or I might just forget how.

Your main fandom of the year?

In the sense of fandom meaning something that you take an active part in, other than merely watching the source material, none. I don't seem to do that anymore. I do belong to a Doctor Who forum, but I only hang out in the bits where nobody ever talks about the show, because fans are frequently best avoided. Since the IMDb forums were decommissioned, I haven't really done a lot of fandoming at all.

Your favourite film watched this year?

It might have to be Guardians of the Galaxy II (2016) by default, simply because I can't remember watching any other films this year. I did watch Scared Stiff (1953) and Living It Up (1954), to celebrate Dean Martin's hundrdth birthday back in June, but those were rewatches, and I'm not sure they count.

Your favourite book read this year?

Ooh, tough one. I'm split three ways. Possibly West With The Night, by Beryl Markham, a beautifully written memoir of the early days of commercial flight in Africa, or possibly Golden Hill, by Francis Spufford, a brilliant story set in the early days of the European settlement of North America, or perhaps Ivory, Apes & Peacocks, by Alan Root, a wonderful memoir about the early days of wildlife filming, mainly in Africa. Really not sure I could choose. Early days seems to be a theme, doesn't it!

Your favourite album or song to listen to this year?

Who Built The Moon?, by Noel Gallagher's High Flying Birds, is definitely my album of the year, in terms of new stuff. Last.fm tells me that the album I've listened to most this year is Queen's Greatest Hits I, and that the song I've listened to most this year is Gerry & the Pacemakers I Like It. Neither of which exactly screams 2017!

Your favourite TV show of the year?

Tough choice between The Gifted (new for this year), and Lucifer, which I think was last year's winner. The former is still getting going, so the latter probably wins again. Agents Of SHIELD is very good again this year, but I'm not voting for it until somebody turns a sodding light on.

Your best new fandom discovery of the year?

The Gifted. Great series. Looks certain to be axed, apparently (now there's a surprise). Meantime it's terrific though, with a fine cast.

Your biggest fandom disappointment of the year?

Maybe Guardians of the Galaxy II. I enjoyed it, but it pales in comparison to the first film, mostly because they have this great gang, and they split them up for most of the film. The bits with Rocket and Groot were brilliant, but the stuff with Peter and his father dragged. Still a good film though, mostly.

Your fandom boyfriend of the year?

Baby Groot. Baby Groot may be the greatest thing ever to happen to film.

Your fandom girlfriend of the year?

A tough one. I think Maze from Lucifer won last year, and she probably wins again, even though she was off filming something else for much of the first half of the present season. AWOL or not, she's Maze. Not only would it be hard for anybody to beat her, but if they did, she'd kill them and me in pretty short order. And with a really funky knife.

Your biggest squee moment of the year?

I believe we covered this extensively last year, but I Do Not Squee. However, Baby Groot. Because Baby Groot. Doing absolutely anything. For example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g94CPc3nb4Q

The most missed of your old fandoms?

Sleepy Hollow :(

The fandom you haven't tried yet, but want to?

None that I can think of. There's nothing that tempts me, I don't think.

Your biggest fan anticipations for the coming year?

New New Who, I guess. Chibbers and Thirteen both. I like Moffat, but it should be good to have some new blood, and although I like Capaldi a lot, I don't know that he's been used especially well. It's a constant strength of the show that it allows for big change, and this feels like the right time for some of that change. Of course, it might all go horribly wrong, but we shall see!
swordznsorcery: (tardis)
( Nov. 13th, 2017 19:41)
I know, I'm rubbish at this. LJ has fallen by the wayside rather, due to general lack of time. I can just about keep up with DreamWidth, but never seem to manage to post anything! Not that there's anything interesting to post.

Currently re-reading Brideshead Revisited, after I saw a picture somewhere of Jeremy Irons and Anthony Andrews with Aloysius the teddy bear. I realised it had been twenty years since I last read it, so I dug out a dog-eared old copy that I had in a cardboard box in the attic (where most of my books live now, due to lack of space). I'm never sure entirely how I feel about Evelyn Waugh - [personal profile] thisbluespirit recently referred to him as cynical, which is rather apt - but I do like Brideshead Revisited quite particularly. I last read it in the spring of 1997, around the time that I took my finals, when I had very little else to do for a while, but sprawl in the sun in the university gardens, reading books that I probably wouldn't have read otherwise. Given that the university was a long re-purposed stately home, a story set in the era of crumbling aristocracy, and the selling-off of old family mansions, was somewhat appropriate. And in fairness, it's about a bisexual man in a very open love triangle with a brother and sister, so it's quite modern too. And the language is very evocative, even if some of the paragraphs do go on for decades. Even more so than this one.

Prior to that I read a terrific book, which I think plenty of you would enjoy. It's called West With The Night, by Beryl Markham, and it's sort of an autobiography. Beryl Markham was the first female bush pilot, and spent a lot of time hurtling about the skies above Africa, being remarkable, and thinking herself perfectly ordinary. And the writing is just astounding. Utterly beautiful and compelling. Apparently everybody has always said that her husband wrote it really, but her biographer can find no evidence that he did, and plenty that he didn't. But everybody still believes it anyway. It's not a big book, and it's out of print, but I happened to find mention of it in some article somewhere, and went a-hunting on eBay, and it wasn't hard to find. Highly recommended (and I think she wrote it).

Watching wise, I've not done much. The BBC was very kind to me, and released Out Of The Blue on DVD. This was a police drama broadcast in the early nineties, which starred John Hannah and Neil Dudgeon, and which nobody but me seems to have seen. Consequently I've been variously accused of madness and imagining. But now it's out on DVD! Proof! And it's still jolly good. The Beeb have also put out another of their old police dramas; Rockliffe's Babies from the mid-eighties, which they've never repeated, and which has trickled away into the darkest recesses of most people's memories. It's about a group of young detectives, under the care of a grizzled old sergeant, and it's rather good (and very eighties). It was my first "grown up" series, watched in secret on a Friday night, when everybody else was out, and my mother was relaxing in the kitchen, off duty. Holds up well. Horribly expensive, but somebody has thoughtfully put it on YouTube. Shut up, yes I know, but I will buy it eventually. Tony Head was just in an episode, and Brian Croucher has just joined as the new boss. Fandoms of the world, collide!

Oh, and I've also just read a beautiful little book called Now We Are Six Hundred, by James Goss, which is basically Now We Are Six, rewritten for Time Lords. You'd think the joke would wear thin, but it never does. It's illustrated rather wonderfully by Russell T Davies, and is full of rhymes about Daleks and Cybermen and Romana. Some of it is very sweet, some of it is very funny, and one or two of the poems are really quite dark. Another one for the recommended list! (And the postscript is fab.)

So there you are. See you again next year. ;)
swordznsorcery: (xenon)
( Oct. 1st, 2017 21:22)
I just found this post, which I apparently wrote on August 6th, and have no memory of at all. I do remember [personal profile] thisbluespirit doing the poetry meme again, and me thinking what a good idea that was; but it's news to me that I actually did it! Anyway, it's a simple enough endeavour (and I recommend it). You write down five fandoms, and then go here, and write down the fifth line of the random poem that you land on - whatever it is, and believe me, there's some doozies. Then hit refresh a few times until you've got five. Use them as inspiration for a ficlet for each fandom. Usually you'll end up with at least four poems by Emily Dickinson, but try not to find it too disheartening. The internet has always been obsessed with her.

(Not posting for two months isn't one of the rules, incidentally. That just happened, for reasons. Mostly involving stupidity.)

... )
swordznsorcery: (face)
( Jul. 31st, 2017 20:56)
I don't think I've done one of these in a while. I don't seem to have done much of anything in a while, except race about the countryside in a whirl, attempting to Get Things Done. Still, on the plus side, one of the Things to get Done is the allotment, which has just started to produce profusions of runner beans, courgettes (bright yellow ones this year!) and raspberries. So I'm tired, but also well fed.

Anyways, I'm reading an especially good book at the moment. I don't really know what it's about, although I'm more than three quarters through - or, that is, I have absolutely no idea where it's heading, or why, but I do sort of know what it's about. Something Awful just happened, and I'm frightfully annoyed, but still loving the book, and looking forward to getting back to it. Seriously, the prose is an utter joy. It's called Golden Hill, and it's by somebody called Francis Spufford. It's about a young man who arrives in 18th century New York, and it's entirely written in 18th century style - so it's a sort of pastiche, in the same way that Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell is, although set rather earlier. Apparently it won the Ondaatje prize (I don't believe I've ever heard of that, but Google tells me its quite prestigious). I recommend it unhesitatingly, if you are not scared off by meandering prose, and sentences that can go on for months.

Telly-watching-wise, I've now seen the first episode of Marchlands, so can claim to have actually seen our new Doctor in something. It's an ITV drama from a few years back, set in three different time zones (the 1960s, the 1980s, and whenever now was at the time). A young girl dies in the sixties, and her ghost makes friends with another young girl in the eighties. It clearly has some knock-on effect for the modern lot, but I haven't found out what yet. That will presumably come later. Jodie Whittaker is the dead girl's mother, and has dark hair, so I didn't recognise her at first. A Yorkshire accent - I wonder if she will keep that. So far it's diverting enough. If you're in the UK, she'll be on the BBC from August 8th, incidentally, in a new series. Trailer here. It also stars Emun Elliot who - after the eternal Paterson Joseph, naturally - was my first choice for the 13th Doctor, so I can amuse myself watching them both being doctors together. If I remember to watch it. Eagle-eyed viewers will of course recognise him from Paradox, The Paradise, and Los Malvados (cough).

There are probably other things, but I do not remember them. So I may just go and collapse in a heap. Albeit a slightly satisfied and accomplished-feeling one. With a nice book.
swordznsorcery: (tardis)
( Jul. 17th, 2017 21:33)
Clocks ticked. So many clocks, lining the walls, ticking and tocking away the seconds of inexorable time. Inexorable, that is, for some. Crawling through the shadows, sonic screwdriver in one hand, a hotch-potch of home-made mischief in the other, came the Doctor. The Clockmaker sought to manipulate time; to twist it to his own evil ends; and the Doctor was the universe's best line of defence. One meddlesome Time Lord, and a great deal of improvising.

Clocks ticked. Time – and so much else – moved on. And yet, mused the Doctor, as she ducked a laser beam, some things never change.
Day Twelve: A song from your pre-teen years.

But all my songs so far have been from my pre-teen years! Or nearly all. I think. I'm being lazy and not checking, but it's a fair assumption. Still, taken literally this one does require something from my lifetime, so we're going for something between 1975 and the beginning of 1988. In which case I choose this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rm9drIwmmU4

- and my apologies that the official upload has rubbish sound quality! Somebody's over done the bass. Adam, however, is not to be discouraged.

That is still the best jacket in pop music.

In other news, I have found out that this is a thing: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1405930055/

Look at it, and marvel at its wonder. And there's a whole series of them! Up to and including Peter Capaldi. Of course they might be awful, but their mere existence has made me smile, so that's good.
swordznsorcery: (tardis)
( Jun. 12th, 2017 21:44)
Lately I have been cruelly ignoring the Kindle, in favour of proper books. This is at least partly [personal profile] elenopa's fault, as she recently went on an Arthur Ransome Society weekend, and made me think (for the hundredth time) that I really ought to give his books another try. I scorned them rather as a child, for not being "proper" adventures, in that there are no bad guys/proper peril/fisticuffs, etc, and did my best to avoid them. Grown Up Me (well, slightly) decided that We Didn't Mean To Go To Sea might be a good place to start a reappraisal, as it has (nearly) proper pirates, and actual proper danger in it. It seemed too long for the amount of plot, and got a bit repetitive in places, but it was good, and I shall probably try another soon. In the meantime I've fallen down an old book rabbit hole, and am currently two thirds of the way through Gerald Durrell's My Family And Other Animals, which I also studiously avoided as a child, probably for much the same reason. It's not such a good read. Much funnier, but suffers from the most horrendously purple prose. It's like swimming up hill through treacle, but with witty anecdotes. It has its attractions, mind. It's my mother's edition, from 1959, and I think [personal profile] thisbluespirit will appreciate the cover:

... )

I do like a colour-coded Penguin!

On the telly front, I'm still wandering through a rewatch of the Beeb's Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell. I love it muchly. This week was episode four, with the King's Roads, and Edward Petherbridge as George III (looking rather older, and considerably less dapper, than when he was Lord Peter Wimsey, just about the only other thing I've seen him in). Why are there only seven episodes? It's not fair. I find myself wanting a wartime spin-off, all about Jonathan doing magic for the army; and that's just for starters.

Oh, and hey - Doctor Who this week! I know it was a bit ridiculous, but I thought it was fun, and I was greatly entertained to see Anthony Calf in it (he was the captain). In 2015 I watched The Monocled Mutineer, Beau Geste and Fortunes Of War more or less at the same time, and he cropped up in all of them, so it was nice to see him again. And, yet again, being a period army type. Still, he didn't get shot this time, which is a step up.

And I think that's all for now. Which is just as well, as if I don't produce some kibble sharpish, I will be eaten by a small ginger cat. Bye.
Title: Tomorrow
Fandom: Doctor Who
Rating: G
Word Count: c. 4000
Characters: The First Doctor, Susan, Barbara and Ian


... )
Title: Fire & Brimstone
Fandom: Could be either Doctor Who or Torchwood
Rating: G
Word Count: c. 400
Characters: Captain Jack Harkness

... )
In honour of John Barrowman's 50th birthday today (11th March, for those of you awkward enough to have drastically different timezones), here's an old favourite from days gone by:



JB is celebrating by launching a t-shirt highlighting trans issues in the States. Go John.
I'm sure that I should probably have been doing useful things today, but instead I have been making clockwork dinosaurs. They don't quite work, at least without some disassembling, and careful sanding down of bits and pieces, but they sort of waddle a bit. My sister found them in Poundland. They're a brilliant design, if very small and fiddly, and putting them together was something of a comedy of rescuing bits from the cats, rescuing bits from the floor, and being incapable of telling one bit from another in the instructions. Clockwork dinosaurs under here )

So that's the only interesting thing that's happened lately. I don't seem to have posted in ages. (No change there then.) I keep meaning to, but I only ever get as far as thinking about what I want to say. I've been intending to mention a book that I read last month, as I know that it may well interest one or two of you. It's called Life With Kenneth Connor, by Jeremy Connor (he of the fisticuffs cameo in Carry On Nurse). It's not a particularly well-written book, and at less than two hundred pages it's not a particularly in-depth book, but it does provide a nice bit of insight into a fascinating life. It also gives a good account of the making of the Carry Ons, and also quite a bit of period theatre, briefly in wartime, and then mostly in the 1950s to the 1980s. Then there's He-de-Hi and 'Allo 'Allo later of course. Some interesting stuff for anybody into vintage BBC TV and radio, or Pinewood Studios. Jon Pertwee pops up, as you might expect given that he was an occasional Carry On-er, and Patrick Troughton also makes an appearance (on a motorbike!), as apparently he and KC were at drama school together. Yep, everybody on TV back then really did know each other.

Anyways, if you don't expect literary brilliance, it's a good little read. Some nice stuff about Kenneth Williams, proof that everybody in the world really does love Joan Sims, and some genuinely pleasant little LGBT moments as an added bonus. Recommended.

Also had some interesting viewing lately. I found this Screen One production on YouTube, called The Police. It's from 1990, and tells the story of a group of primary school children who set up their own police force to combat bullying. Everything goes wrong of course. An odd subject for a Screen One, since they were usually about adults, but then for all that the cast are young kids, it's not a childish story. Not cheerful or happy, but worth a watch!

Other than that, this month I have mostly been staring in mounting horror and befuddlement at the daily news, and getting caught in the rain. Meanwhile it's apparently February already. Whoever put the year into fast-forward, kindly put it back to normal speed. There's snowdrops out and daffodils coming up, and I've barely got the hang of January.

PS: Festivids happened! And there was much good stuff. Here, have some links (beneath the cut):... )

And now I have to go and do something more useful than clockwork dinosaurs. Bye.
[community profile] fandom_stocking fic for [personal profile] thisbluespirit.

Fandom: Press Gang
Characters: Lynda and Spike
Gen, 3200 words

... )
swordznsorcery: (Default)
( Dec. 31st, 2016 20:48)
Obligatory end-of-year post. I was going to do the meme that everybody's posting today, but it's got too many questions! I get bored after answering about ten. So instead I'll point you at this rather wonderful 2016 song, which nicely sums up everything we've all been thinking. Not safe for work; but then it probably couldn't have been. It's tempting to hope for better for 2017, but bearing in mind that Trump hasn't even come to power yet, my natural tendency towards optimism is currently feeling a tad wobbly.

2016, then. The good bits. Best telly (other than the mothballed old stuff that I usually watch) has probably been Lucifer. I heartily recommend that one to most of you. Season one was fun last year, but season two has been terrific, and Tom Ellis is a revelation. Here he is (in character) belting out a jazzed up version of All Along The Watchtower.

Best book... I wish I could say the final Temeraire, but it seemed a bit of a damp squib, somehow. Mind you, my expectations were probably set a bit high. Instead I think I'll go with The Tyrannosaur Chronicles by Dave Hone, because tyrannosaurs. Basically he wrote the book I've been wanting since I was about four. Now all I need is for somebody to write similar ones for all the other types of dinosaur! And Dimetrodon while they're at it. And listen! The first fireworks of the evening.

Best music is an awkward one, as I don't listen to much modern stuff. Lee Mead put out a new album earlier this year, called Some Enchanted Evening, which I like a lot. Nice to see him doing some old standards, as he always was good at them. And Holly Johnson had a new single out this year called Ascension, which was good. Even if did come from the Eddie the Eagle film. (Sorry, I grew up in Cheltenham. I have an Eddie the Eagle allergy.)

Best film is another awkward one. Pretty sure I've only seen one 2016 film this year, which was the live action (well, mostly CGI, actually) remake of The Jungle Book. Fortunately I absolutely loved it, which is just as well, as I guess it wins by default. Trailer here.

Looking back at my list, I see that the first book I read in 2016 was Immortal In Death by JD Robb. Sounds frighteningly prescient for the year that was to follow, so if all of that was in any way my fault, I apologise! Last book of the year was Is There Life Outside The Box? by Peter Davison. Less murder, more jokes. Also, a special pair of sentences for you, [personal profile] thisbluespirit! On page 196: "I was keen to make The Last Detective; it reminded me of a show I'd watched as a teenager called Public Eye that starred Alfred Burke. With its easy pace and gentle humour and world-weary central character, it had been a success for many years." (Yeah, he's not in love with punctuation. Sorry about that. ;) The index, however, is a thing of beauty.) But see! All you need to do is abduct Peter Davison, and extract the missing episodes from his brain! This is a faultless plan for 2017.

Um. And I shall leave it there. Happy 2017, everybody. Let's try to keep the NHS; try to stop Trump inadvertently starting a nuclear war with China via Twitter; and, I don't know. Hope that Trump takes his head off, and reveals that he was Hillary Clinton all along? Well, it's a thought.

See you in January.
.

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