swordznsorcery: (methos)
( Jan. 2nd, 2017 16:25)
[community profile] fandom_stocking fic for [personal profile] liadtbunny.

Fandom: Sapphire & Steel
Gen, 3000 words

... )
http://lost-spook.livejournal.com/325603.html

Sapphire and Steel, any element, a rogue Transuranic element

Fandom: Sapphire & Steel
Characters: Original
Gen, c. 9000 words

Cut for length )
swordznsorcery: (xenon)
( Jan. 3rd, 2014 14:11)
[community profile] fandom_stocking fic for [personal profile] lost_spook.

Fandom: Blake's 7/Sapphire & Steel (crossover)
Characters: Avon, Tarrant, Dayna, Sapphire, Silver, Steel
Gen, c. 6500 words

... )
Last Christmas when America stole all the television, I dug out my Sapphire & Steel DVDs to watch instead. It's taken me a year, but I've finally got around to watching a bit more of it. Somehow, given that it's the slowest programme in the history of television, the ridiculously slow pace of my viewing seems apt. Here we have "Assignment Three", then, in which the hilariously slow pace gets even slower, and the spectacularly low budget becomes ever more apparent. Gasp as our heroes spend three episodes standing on a roof! Thrill to the excitement as they spend another three episodes walking slowly through an empty flat! And prepare to be horrified by this adventure's dastardly foes: a small patch of light, a psychotic pillow, and a coat that won't stay on its peg.

... )
Day twenty-two, your favourite series finale. Awkward, given that television tends to axe most of the shows that I watch, without giving them a finale. Sometimes that's a good thing - there are some shows where it's better to leave them going on to fight another day, rather than brought to an ultimate stop - but even if it's for the best, it doesn't make for a memorable finish. There are a few could-have-beens. The intended Between The Lines finale, at the close of series two, was one of the best ever, and although I liked series three more than most people did, the eventual final episode was a bit of a mess. Had Buffy The Vampire Slayer ended with season five, I might have gone for that one. Blake's 7 nearly wins it. I love the final episode (although I love the originally intended one, closing series three, rather more). "Blake" is just too downbeat to win, though. Ditto the Sapphire & Steel closer; and since neither was supposed to be a final episode, I'm not sure that they should count anyway. We're forever left wondering what would have happened next, if it had been allowed to. So, just like with the favourite TV show cast, I'm left having to choose between Babylon 5 and The West Wing. Both brought their respective stories and casts to a good conclusion, and both were handled exceptionally well. The final season of Babylon 5, however, didn't throw an unfathomable curveball at Toby, and have him act against character and lose his job. So I'm choosing it. Sorry, The West Wing. I love you, and almost everything about you. I love your characters, and I loved spending seven great years in their company, but you screwed up at the end there. So did Babylon 5, admittedly, but at least the showrunner apologised. He even said that he regretted getting rid of Marcus, which doesn't actually make up for getting rid of Marcus, damn it!, but it's a start. And at least Marcus isn't actually dead. Toby, however, is still technically a traitor, which prevented the finale from being everything that it could have been.

And besides, it's "Sleeping In Light". You really do have to go some to beat that.
Day two, a show that you wish more people were watching. That sounds very present tense. I'm not actually watching any TV at the moment, so I'll just have to go for an old show that more people ought to see. And there are hundreds. I've practically made a lifelong hobby of being in a fandom of one, and there are times when it would be nice to have somebody to talk to about a bunch of stuff! But if I'm going to have to choose one, then I'm going to go for Voyagers!.

I've chosen this one because it's one that I think a lot of people would like, if they actually knew that it existed. Although it's American, it bears more than a passing resemblance to classic era Doctor Who, and it also seems very much like a forerunner to Quantum Leap. Phineas Bogg, one of the most unfortunately-named men in television history, is a time-travelling pirate. Take a moment to ponder the wonders of that sentence. He's one of a number of agents chosen from throughout history to travel back and forth in time and see that history goes the right way. Just like in Sapphire & Steel and Quantum Leap, there's some undefined force that likes to meddle, and twist history to its own ends. Problem is, Bogg hasn't got a clue what history is supposed to look like, and neither does he have a clue how to pilot his time machine. The consequence is that he hurtles madly though time and space, landing in ever-increasing amounts of peril each week, and having a glorious time every step of the way. He accidentally acquires an orphan boy as a travelling companion, and their relationship is very nicely done.

Basically Voyagers! is brilliant fun. That exclamation mark in the title is there for good reason, because it shows you how happy the show is, and how happy our two Voyagers are to be doing their job. Repeatedly free-falling through history, and crash-landing somewhere unexpected, up to their necks in trouble, and escaping by the skin of their teeth. If you ever get frustrated by all of the angst in modern day Doctor Who, then this is the show to counteract it. Bogg hurls his little twelve-year old pal into deadly situations daily, and neither of them cares a fig. Danger's so much fun! And the cast is extremely engaging, and okay, the pilot episode is a bit slow. They usually are.

So there you are, world. Watch Voyagers!. It only got one season, so there's not much to watch (and it got axed for being too expensive, not because it wasn't popular, so for once I'm not even recommending something daft). I can't guarantee that you'll enjoy it, but I'd be very surprised if you don't. The internet needs more Voyagers!. Isn't that right, Bogg?



Oh well. Everyone's a critic.
I forgot I hadn't posted this yet. Actually I forgot I hadn't written it yet, but I guess posting episode reviews in slow motion is kind of fitting in this case. So, yeah. "Assignment Two", then. Which I actually watched over the new year, which could make recapping it interesting. Fortunately it's my favourite bit of Sapphire & Steel, so I've watched it more than I have the rest. This will either help or it won't.

It probably won't. )
In the early eighties, ITV decided to have another go at a science fiction series. Perhaps inspired by the BBC's famously low budget successes, they - or rather writer PJ Hammond - came up with Sapphire & Steel. Impressively taking budgets to a whole new low, this was a series that focused on atmosphere first and foremost. Action scenes weren't so much limited as non-existent, and the special effects made the cardboard wonders of Blake's 7 look hi-tech. All of which sounds like criticism, but isn't. Sapphire & Steel is pretty unique. Whereas most shows made on a limited budget try to hide that fact, Sapphire & Steel didn't bother. They had their own rules, right from the opening scenes of episode one. Who are Sapphire and Steel? We don't know. Where are they from? We don't know. What is it that they do, and to what purpose, under what authority? All we have are theories, on all counts. The only thing we know for certain is that, when weird things happen, there they are, popping up from who knows where, who knows how, to combat who knows what. Their arsenal consists of long, meaningful stares, and they tackle their enemy by talking a great deal, being very thoughtful, and doing their best to avoid breaking into a run. Nothing in Sapphire & Steel happens quickly. It's as far removed from modern television as a high speed bullet train is from a tortoise. A particularly slow, meandering tortoise, that doesn't have any pressing engagements.

... )
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